THE TOWN OF SALE.

Proclaimed a Borough in 1863 and a Town in 1944.

Area-5442 acres. Population-5000. Dwellings- 1146. Length of streets-43 miles. Average rainfall-24 inches. Altitude-32 feet.

Valuations, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £1,162,220; Nett Annual Value, £58,111.

Rate, 1945-General rate of 2/Sd. in the £ levied on Nett Annual Values.

Enlistments from Town-603.

Honour Winner-Squadron Leader Jack Storey, D.F.C.; Flying Officer J. H. Scott Lyon (deceased), D.F.C.; Flying Officer F. M. Jackson (deceased), D.F.M.

Newspaper-“The Gippsland Times,” published on Mondays and Thursdays.

Electoral Divisions-Federal: Gippsland. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., Gipps­ land North.

THE TOWN COUNCIL, 1945-46.

Mayor-Cr. C. C. G. F. Shellew, J.P.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. J. E. Christie; R. G. Howard; J. J. Smith; L. F. Andrews; J. E. Thomson; A. Ronchi; R. M. Rolland; F. W. Chalmer, J.P.

COUNCIL OFFICERS.

Town Clerk, Interim Valuer and Secretary, and Receiver to Town Waterworks-J. R. Ray, J.P., A.F.I.A., A.A.C.A., A.I.M.A.
Town and Building Surveyor-$. Shaw, C.E. Treasurer-R. N. Meldrum.
Assistant Clerk-Miss B. Dowd.
Infant Welfare Sisterister R. Swanton.
Health Inspector-W. J. Gunn, A.R. San. I.
Health Officer-Dr. A. Macdonald, M.B., B.S.

The Council meets on the first and third Mondays in the month.

The Town of Sale is an important and highly progressive township, 128 miles east of Melbourne by rail on the main Gippsland line to Orbost. It is situated in the southern corner of the Shire of Avon, and owing to its geographical and central situation is recog­nised as the Capital of Gippsland. The sur­rounding district is prolific in its production of agricultural and dairying products, and in its production of wool and fat lambs for market. As a result of the excellent market­ing and shopping facilities in the town, it has become very popular as a shopping centre, and many people f rom neighbouring areas visit it to supply their needs, and it services an approximate average area of a radius of about 16 miles from the town.

It is the most important administrative centre in Gippslcmd, and is the See of two bishops. Government Departments are well represented, and the only Supreme Court and gaol east of Melbourne are in the town. It is ihe headquarters of a Superintendent of Police, banks and insurance companies are represented, and there are two wireless stations in the town, namely, 3GI National Regional Station and a commercial station, 3TR. The Gippsland base hospital in the town is well equipped and caters for a daily ‘average of 100 patients. There is an infec­tious diseases block, recently modernised, and an infantile paralysis after-care ward, and plans are already made to enlarge and im­prove the facilities of the institution in the post-war period.

It is also an important educational centre, there being State High Schools for boys and girls, a State School, a Catholic Primary School, a Carbolic day and boarding school for girls, a Maris! Brothers College for boys, Church of England Girls’ Grammar School and the Sale Technical School for boys and girls is one of the best equipped outside of Melbourne. ‘Bus services subdidised by the Government bring in the pupils to the various schools from neighbouring towns.
Recreational facilities are admirable; there is a large and commodious picture theatre, many dances are held and the social life of the town is very active. Sportsmen are well catered for by an 18-hole golf course, bowl­ing green, croquet greens, tennis courts and ovals, and fishing and shooting may be had all the year round. Only 22 miles away from the town is the well-known Ninety Mile Beach. Excellent swimming facilities are available at the Sale Municipal Baths and in the river close to the town.

Transport services are excellent, there being normally two trains each way each day from the Metropolis including Sundays, thus providing the visitor with an oppor­tunity to visit Sale and return in the same day. Road facilities are good, and the well­ kept Prince’s Highway passes through the town. Taxi and ‘bus services are available at all convenient hours in the town.

Water supply and electric light are avail­able in and around the town, there being an abundance of water in the Thomson River from which the water is pumped to the Coun­cil’s up-to-date and efficient filtration plant and then reticuldted from a storage tower. Electricity is supplied from the State Commission’s mains direct from Yallourn. Gas is supplied from the gas works owned by the Gas Supply Company Limited, and there is a high consumption of the same. Looking to the future, this company is extending its works. Sewerage has not yet been installed, although the Sale Sewerage Authority is constituted, but operations were suspended owing to the war. Immediately labour and matenals re available they will be pro­ceeded with and the scheme will cost £105,000 and house connections will run to approximately another £60,000.

Sale is an important centre of rural indus­try. A textile factory employs 86 employees and will be extended as soon as manpower is available. There is a clothing factory em­ploying 37, general engineering and found­ing works employing 28, bacon curers and smallgoods manufacturers employing 25, a co-operative butter and cool storage company employing  23,  a  dry  cleaners  employing  21. a flour  milling  company,  a  cordial  company. a  steam  laundry.   and a brickworks.  Many of these industries me making plans for post­ war  expansion.

With an ample rainfall and  centrally  situ­ated  in  a  rich  area,  the  future  of  the   town of Sale is assured. Owing to  Air  Force activities through the war, facilities are now available for  civil  aviation,  and  to  the  west of Sale  a  start  has  already  been  made  with an irrigation scheme for the Nambrok-Denison district. The progressive town Council has proposals for works which include  a  new Infant Welfare Centre. a memorial embracing Municipal Chambers and a Community Wel­fare Centre.  A  housing  scheme  is  also ready.

THE SHIRE OF ALBERTON.

Created a District in 1855 and proclaimed a Shire in 1864.

Area-992½ sq. miles. Population–6161. Dwellings- 1540. Length of roads-965 miles. Average rainfall-,30 inches. Altitude-68 feet at Yarram.

Valuations, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £2,152,240; Nett Annual Value, £107,612.

Rate, 1945-General rate of 2/5d. in ihe £ levied on Nett Annual Values.

Enlistments f rom Shire area-approximate­ ly 400.

Newspaper- “The Gippsland Standard,” published at Yarram every Tuesday and Fri­ day.

Electoral Divisions-Federal: Gippsland. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. LA., Gipps­ land South; Gippsland North.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL, 1945-46.

President-Cr. W. L. Moore.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. G. L. Bird; W. Stichling; E. 0. Hobson; C. R. L. Stockwell; B. F. Dessent; J. D. Macnee; W. Macauley, M.L.C.; R. M. Irving.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Shire Secretary-A. W. Curry.
Shire Engineer-K. W. Black. B.E.E.
Acting Engineer-V. W. Hiort.
Health Officer-Dr. H. H. Martin. M.B., B.S.

The Council meets on the second Thursday in the month.

Shire Headquarters- Yarram.

This farming and grazing area is situated at the southern end of the eastern coast of Victoria, immediately north of the Gippsland Peninsula and Wilson’s Promontory. Dairy­ing is the main industry and is particularly profitable owing to the very suitable nature of the flat and undulating country mostly found. whilst fat stock raising. pig breeding and sheep farming are also extensively car­ried on. There are butter and cheese factories in several townships in the Shire and at Yarram, the Shire headquarters, the butter factory ha;; an output annually of about 1000 tons and the cheese factory of over 300 tons. Some mining for brown coal is carried on in the Shire. and in parts that are heavily timbered, timber-cutting is a considerable in­dustry.

The Shire has many varied attractions for the tourist and many visitors flock there every year. Farram township (population, about 1500) is 136 miles east of Melbourne by rail by a fast. comfortable service, and motorists have the choice of a number of different and picturesque routes. Yarram is well equipped with water and electricity supply, three hotels and a number of varied sporting clubs are located in the town. A fine new Shire Hall has been recently added to its attractions.

Yarram is an excellent centre from which excursions may be made to the many beauty spots in the Shire. The natural bushland park of Tara Valley covers 241 acres and is colourful with many varieties of plants. The Tara Valley Falls and Cyathea Falls are magnificent sights. Bulg Park and Yerrang Park are delightf ul bush areas and camping sites.
Fishermen find plenty of good sport within easy reach of Yarram; rivers and creeks abounding with fish, and eight miles away is Port Albert on the coast where boating irips may be had to numerous surrounding islands. There are a number of beaches on the coast providing excellent surfing and good fishing. Over the whole Shire shooting may be had, rabbits and foxes b,sing plenti­ful, and, in the season, quail, snipe and duck abound. The holiday-maker will find many and varied attractions in this area.

THE SHIRE OF AVON.

Created a District in 1864 and proclaimed a Shire in 1865.

Area-843 sq. miles. Population-3650. Dwellings-800. Length of roads-360 miles. Average rainfall-24 inches. Altitude-75 feet at Stratford.

Valuations, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £1.117,760; Nett Annual Value, £55,888.

Rate, 1945-General rate of 2s. in the £ levied on Nett Annual Values.

Electoral Divisions–Federal: Gippsland. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., Gipps­ land North; Gippsland East.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL. 1945-46.

President-Cr. S. A. Ross.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. E. J. J. Lee; J. MacLachlan; R. S. Mawley, J.P.; A. A. W. Stewart, J.P.; G. Riley. J.P.; A. Guy, J.P.; H. L. Treasure; J. Scott.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Secretary and Engineer-J. G. W. C. Short, C.E.. J.P.
Assist. Secretary and Collector-E. C. Bock.
Health Officer–Dr. O. R. Brent, M.B., B.S.

The Council meets on the first Monday in the month.

Shire Headquarters–Stratford.

This Shire is of peculiar shape in that, with the town of Sale on its southern border, it extends norihwards and eastwards for some 15 miles and then shoots up a narrow corridor to the north, where a large area opens up in somewhat mountainous country. In the more southern portion the land is flat to gently undulating. becoming hilly and mountainous in the north. Rural industries comprise wool growing, fat lamb raising, cattle breeding and fattening, and dairying; agricultural products being beetroot, oats. flax, maize ,and lucerne. Some mining is still carried out in the Shire.

The Shire township of Stratford has a popu­lation of about 700 and is situated on the main Gippsland line in a pastoral and dairy­ing district. Some horse breeding is also carried on around the town. It is situated on the Avon River and is supplied with electric light and water. There is an hotel and all sporting clubs including two race clubs. In the north of the Shire lies the township of Darga, which is a farming and mining area. There are a number of small agricultural settlements scattered throughout the Shire.

THE SHIRE OF BAIRNSDALE.

Created a District in 1867 and proclaimed a Shire in 1868.

Area-937 sq. miles. Population-9000. Dwellings-2200. Length of roads-1028 miles. Average rainfall-35 inches. Altitude-46 feet at Bairnsdale and rising to mountainous country in the north.

Valuations, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £3,198,860; Nett Annual Value, £159,943.

Rates, 1945-General rates of 1s. 9d. in the £ in the East, West and South Ridings, and 2s. in the £ in the Centre Riding; a Water Rate (Bairnsdale Waterworks Trust) of 1s. in the £ (minimums of 25s. for buildings and Ss. on vacant land); Sewerage Rate Bairnsdale Sewerage Authority) of 1/6d. in the £; all rates levied on Nett Annual Values. Also Sanitary Charge of £1/15/- per annum for weekly service plus 7/- garbage service within the garbage area.

Newspapers-“The Bairnsdale Advertiser,” published on Tuesdays and Fridays; “Every Week,” published at Bairnsdale on Tuesdays and Fridays.

Electoral Divisions-Federal: Gippsland. State: L.C.. Gippsland Province. L.A., Gipps­ land North; Gippsland East.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL, 1945-46.

President-Cr. A. J. Gilsenan, J.P.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. T. H. Peart; T. W. Murphy, O.B.E.; W. Medlyn; G. S. Telfer; W. H. Dumaresq; B. McMahon; W. H. Turner; D. M. Cameron; T. Stephenson; T. Sim; A. H. Morrison.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Secretary and Collector-E. Lloyd Brindley, A.I.C.A., L.C.A.;
Acting Engineer-H. E. Bellamy, C.E.
Treasurer-H. Downs.
Health Officer-Dr. L. E. Clay. M.B.. B.S.
Shire Headquarters- Bairnsdale.

The Shire of Bairnsdale covers an agricul­tural and pastoral strip of country which ex­tends from the eastern coast of Victoria and the famous Ninety Mile Beach, inland and northwards for about forty miles. In earlier years gold rushes to various points in the Shire helped to populate the area and mining was carried on in a number of settlements. Little mining activity now remains, and dairy­ing comprises one of the chief pursuits. Sheep and cattle are grazed and fruit, corn and other grain grown.

The Shire township of Bairnsdale is situ­ated on the Mitchell River, 171 miles east of Melbourne by rail and on the main Prince’s Highway. Though inland from the sea. Lake King and the river are navigable. Bairnsdale is used as a port for the export of produce. It has gas and electricity, water and sewer­ age supply, and educational facilities range up to a School of Mines, High School and other State Schools. The town is well laid out with beautiful gardens in the streets, and a feature of the latter are the fine shade trees set along the edges of the gardens. Industries include butter factories, soap fac­tory. cordial factory, tannery and sawmills. Timber-getting is a considerable industry in the inland part of the Shire, and there are several freestone quarries. There are eight hotels, a Municipal saleyards, usual and adequate business houses, botanical gardens and all classes of sport are catered for.

The Shire and especially the coastal part thereof has a special appeal to the tourist by reason of the nearby Gippsland Lakes. Lakes Entrance and the Ninety Mile sea beach. The Gippsland Lakes comprise a chain of waterways over 50 miles in length. providing gorgeous lake scenery, fishing and boating. Bairnsdale is the centre of a large tourist traffic and from it many fine excur­sions may be made. Five miles away is the well known Eagle Point, which provides a wonderful panorama of the whole Lakes sys­tem. Nearby are a number of fine forest areas. Good fishing is found in the Lakes and on the coast nearby, where excellent surfing beaches are situated. The port is a busy one as much of the produce of Eactern Gippsland and the Monaro Plains passes through it.

THE SHIRE OF BULN BULN.

Proclaimed a Shire in 1878.

Area-472 sq. miles. Population-6700. Dwellings-2000. Length of roads-295 miles. Average rainfall-30 inches. Altitude-444 feet at Drouin.

Valuations, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £1,844,940; Nett Annual Value, £92,247.

Rate, 1945-General rate of 2/6d. in the £ levied on Nett Annual Values.

Newspaper-“The Gippsland Independent,” published weekly on Thursdays.

Electoral Divisions – Federal: Flinders; Gippsland. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., Gippsland; Walhalla; Gippsland West.

SHIRE COUNCIL, 1945-46.

President-Cr. W. J. Moyes.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. H. F. McCay, J.P.; E. R. Smethurst, J.P.; F. A. Lilley; A. G. Pretty; E. G. Porter, J.P.; C. W. Rowe, J.P.; A. Goudie, J.P.; E. A. Ronalds.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Shire Secretary and Interim Valuer-T. J. Ryan, J.P.
Shire Engineer-R. E. Ross, C.E.
Clerk-Miss I. Thorne.
Health Officer-Dr. E. J. C. Hamp.
Health Inspector-W. E. Apted. Treasurer-P. Quinn.

The Council meets on the third Monday in the month.

Shire Headquarters-Drouin.

This Shire is a stretch of dairying and grazing country which lies to the south-east of Melbourne and to the south of the Shire of Upper Yarra. Generally, the soils are rich and particularly adapted to the pastur­ing of dairy cattle, and with a very generous rainfall .and excellent climate the area is capable of great production. In parts the country is very hilly and well timbered. Apart from dairying, timber is cut and flax is grown. Some general farming, including onion and potatn growing and pig raising, is carried on in various districts. The Shire Hall is situated in the township of Drouin, which is 56 miles from Melbourne on the main Gippsland railway. It is a very pro­gressive township with a population al about 1100 and 280 dwellings. There is water supply and electricity, and adequate sporting and other facilities including a baby health centre. It is surrounded by extremely fer­tile dairying land which feeds about 20,000 milking cows, and this is the main industry in the area. There is a substantial butter factory in the town and cheese factory, saw­ mill and a flax mill, and it is estimated that about 250 persons are employed in the manu­facture of milk products and the processing of flax. There are a number of smaller dairying and farming settlements throughout the Shire, and in most of these saw milling is a steady industry. The main Prince’s Highway, the coastal road from Melbourne to New South Wales, passes through the township. It is interestinq to note that the derivation of the name “Buln Buln” approxi­mates the favourite utterance of Gippsland’s native Lyre birds.

THE SHIRE OF MAFFRA.

Proclaimed a Shire in 1875.

Area-1603 sq. miles. Population-7000. Dwellings- 1450. Length of roads-415 miles. Average rainfall-36 inches. Altitude-87 feet at Maffra

Valuations, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £2,630,840; Nett Annual Value, £131, 542.

Rate, 1945-General rate of 1/11d. in the £ levied on Nett Annual Values.

Newspapers-“The Maffra Spectator,” pub­lished on Monday and Thursday; “The Hey­field News,” published at Heyfield weekly on Thursdays.

Electoral Divisions-Federal: Gippsland; Deakin. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., Gippsland North; Upper Goulburn.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL, 1945-46.

President-Cr. W. E. Kelly, J.P.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. T . M. Malcolm; W. M. Killeen; T. A. Tohns, T.P.; G. A. Gray, T.P.; G. Stewart; G. Batchelor; C. J. Rawlings; S. H. Riggall; M. Coleman; D. Coleman; A. G. Beech.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Secretary, Rate Collector and Valuer-M. H. McMahon, J.P.
Assistant Secretary-A. V. Juratowitch.
Engineer-H. J. Hallows, C.E., A.M.I.E.A.
Treasurer-P. F. H. Hore.
Medical Officer of Health-Dr. O. R. Brent, M.B., B.S.
Health Inspector-W. U. Hughes.
Acting Health Inspector-T. T. Tulk.
Prosecuting Officer-T. A. Mitchelmore.

The Council meets on the first Tuesday in the month.

Shire Headquarters-Maffra.

The Shire of Maffra is a somewhat sparsely populated area in south-eastern Victoria. The southern portion of the Shire consists mainly of undulating dairying and pastoral country, whilst in the north, where the population is very scattered, the country is somewhat mountainous, and there are some very high peaks. Mount Howitt, in the extreme north of the Shire, near the boundary of the Shire of Mansfield, is 5715 feet above sea level, and further south, towards the middle of the Shire, Mount Tamboritba is 5381 feet above sea level. The Shire is well watered, having the Moroka River in the mountains near its north-eastern boundary, and the Macallister River, in the western portion of the Shire. flowing from the north, southwards through the Shire and down through the town of Sale. The northern portion of the Shire is heavily limbered and as yet practically unsettled.

The main south coast railway crosses the extreme southern portion of the Shire, and in this area, and in the northern district above it, there is closer settlement and in­tense farming. Grazing, dairying, corn grow­ing and mixed farming are intensely carried on, and in addition beet sugar, honey, fruit, bark and Umber are produced.

The township of Maffra, in which the Shire Hall is situated, is a progressive township with a population of about 2200 and is equip­ped with a water supply from the Macallister River, electricity and sewerage. Educational facilities include a State School, a Convent, Higher Elementary School and some privctte schools. There are three hotels, recreation grounds and public park, and quite good sporting facilities. Excellent pigeon shooting may be had in the area. In this district sugar-beet is widely cultivated and is an industry that is being considerably developed. The Government-owned beet sugar factory in Maffra produces from 5000 to 6000 tons of sugar per year. This is obtained from 40,000 to 50,000 tons of beet, which is grown on 4234 acres of land, half of which is irrigated.
In the town there are also two milk product factories and three butter factories; the rearing of poultry in this area is also considerable. Maffra is situated on a branch railway line which leaves the Gippsland line at Traralgon and runs through to Stratford, and is 131 miles east of Melbourne.

THE SHIRE OF MIRBOO.

Proclaimed a Shire in 1894.

Area-95 sq. miles. Population- 1500. Dwellings-411. Length of roads-218 miles. Average rainfall-40 inches. Altitude-900 feet at Mirboo North.

Valuations, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £619,000; Nett Annual Value, £30,950.

Rate, 1945-General rate of 3s. in the £ levied on Nett Annual Values.

Newspaper-“The Gippsland and Mirboo Times,” published at Mirboo North weekly on Thursdays.

Electoral Divisions-Federal: Gippsland. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., Gipps­ land South; Walhalla; Wonthaggi.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL, 1945-46.

President-Cr. H. E. Drake.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. R. R. Farmer; P. D. Campbell; A. E. McPhie; B. T. Drowley; Miss G. Watt.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Secretary, Rate Collector and Interim Valuer-T. C. Summers.
Engineer-F. H. Osborne.
Health Inspector-W. E. Apted.

The Council meets on the first Wednesday in the month.

Shire Headquarters-Mirboo North.

Situated in the Gippsland area the Shire of Mirboo is devoted principally to dairying with some sheep raising. It is mainly com­prised of hilly country which was originally very heavily timbered, but much of it has now been cleared. Timber-cutting is still carried on to a considerable extent.

The Shire office is at Mirboo North, which has a population of about 600 and is 100 miles south-east of Melbourne by rail. It has electric light and power from Yallourn, excellent sporting facilities, including swim­ ming baths, and a butter factory, freezing works and timber mills. The Mirboo North Agricultural Society and the Local Progress Association are very active bodies. The township of Mirboo is eight miles from Mirboo North and is surrounded by rich and fertile pastures. There are brown coal deposits in this area, and most of the area of the Shire is specially noted for bauxite deposits, which are acknowledged as probably the richest in Australia. There is much scenic beauty in the hilly country and good roads attract many tourists. There are creeks and water­ falls and innumerable fern gullies; fishing and shooting are excellent.

THE SHIRE OF MORWELL.

Proclaimed a Shire in 1892.

Area-266¼ sq. miles. Population-9000. Dwellings-2700. Length of roads-450 miles. Average rainfall-30 inches. Altitude­ varies from 200 feet to 2300 feet, being 283 feet at Morwell.

Valuations, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £2,000,000; Nett Annual Value, £100,000.

Rate, 1945-General rate of 2s. in the £ levied on Nett Annual Values.

Newspaper-“The Morwell Advertiser,” published at Morwell weekly on Thursdays.

Electoral Divisions-Federal: State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., South Gippsland; Walhalla.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL, 1945-46.

President-Cr. D. J. White, J.P.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. A. W. Ronald; J. McInnes; T. Quigley. J.P.; A. Hall; J. H. Catterick; R. J. Long, J.P.; M. F. Walker; E. K. Penaluna; A. L. Hare, J.P.; D. G. Williams; A. M. Coleman.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Secretary and Engineer-N. W. Baldy, B.C.E.
Health Officer-Dr. H. W. T. Mitchell, M.B.

The Council meets on the third Wednesday in the month.

Shire Headquarters-Morwell.

This Shire is situated in the Gippsland dis­trict of the State, east and slightly south of Melbourne. Part of the country is undulating, while some of it is hilly and rugged. Throughout the Shire in the undulating coun­try dairying is extensively carried on, and the Shire township of Morwell is the centre of this industry. It is situated 89 miles east of Melbourne by rail near the Morwell River and has a population of about 3000. It has electric light from Yallourn, water supply and sewerage, two hotels and all sporting facilities. Secondary industries include a butter factory and a pulp and paper works controlled by the Australian Paper Manu­facturers Limited, which employs over 1000 men. Boolarra is a dairying township with a population of 480 and sawmills and a butter factory.

Some of the mountainous country is very heavily timbered and, besides providing much scenic and forest beauty, provides for an in­dustry of timber-felling and milling. On the northern borders of the Shire are situated the works of the State Electricity Commis­sion at Yallourn. The whole area of the Shire is apparently rich with brown coal de­ posits and the same are mined at the Brown Coal Mine on Latrobe River, seven miles north-west of Morwell. Here is the largest brown coal deposit yet discovered. The coal is mined out of the great open cut and is then consumed in the Yalloum works. The electricity works employ more than 1000 men and from the same electricity is sent prac­tically all over the State of Victoria. It is anticipated that the brown coal deposits will last for many years.

The township of Yallourn is laid out on modern town-planning lines and in addition to the Commission’s power house there is a briquette works, a brickworks, Higher Elementary, Primary and Technical Schools, public health clinics and centres and up-to­-date business premises. Sporting facilities are excellent, including children’s play­ grounds. Through this area the beautiful Latrobe River sweeps, providing the visitor and the resident with much beautiful scenery.

THE SHIRE OF NARRACAN.

Proclaimed a Shire in 1878.

Area-900 sq. miles. Population-8700. Dwellings- 2398. Length of roads-1063 miles. Average rainfall-35 inches. Altitude-223 feet at Trafalgar and about the same at Moe.

Valuations, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £2,.328,060; Nett Annual Value, £116,453.

Rate, 1945-General rate of 2/3d. in the £ levied on Nett Annual Values.

Newspapers-“The Gippsland News,” pub­lished at Trafalgar weekly on Thursdays; “The Trafalgar and Yarragon Times,” pub­lished weekly on Mondays; “The Narracan Shire Advocate,” published at Moe weekly on Fridays.

Electoral Divisions – Federal: Gippsland. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., Wal­halla.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL, 1845-46.

President-Cr. W. A. Moncur, M.L.A.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. G. C. Purvis; W. T. Smallcombe; F. S. Bayley; H. J. Harvey; R. L. Trickey; F. R. Powell; R. L. Dowie; E. A. Guy; J. J. Shep­pard; M. C. Morgan; A. G. Boswell.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Secretary and Collector-T. K. Shanahan.
Shire Engineer-R. E. Ross, C.E.
Treasurer-M. O’Connell.
Health Inspector-W. E. Apted.

The Council meets on the second Monday in the month.

Shire Headquarters-Trafalgar.

The Shire of Narracan comprises a large area which lies due east of Mell::ourne in the Gippsland Peninsula. It is crossed by the main Gippsland railway, and f;om Moe, in the south-east of the Shire, a branch railway line runs north to the town of Wal­halla in the north-eastern portion of the Shire. It is well watered by the Aberfeldy and Thomson Rivers in the mountainous northern part, and by the Latrobe River in the south. The country generally is hilly to mountainous, and is devoted to dairying and grazing pursuits with some agriculture. Coal mining is carried on in the southern portion, which is within the Morwell brown coal area, and gold mining is carried on in the north. The Shire Hall is situated in the township of Traralgon, which is 74 miles east of Mel­bourne by rail and has a population of about 1000. Here the country is not so hilly and this township is the centre of a rich agricul­tural and dairying area. It is supplied with water and electricity; sporting facilities are usual and adequate, and there is a butter and milk factory in the town. It is a centre from which trips may be had to the Erica Snowfield and the Baw Baw Mountains. Large quantities of potatoes and much flax are also grown in the surrounding area.

Moe, on the main line, 80 miles east of Melbourne, is the hub of an agricultural area. It has a population of about 1000, two hotels. adequate sporting clubs and facilities, and there is a very large seasoning and joinery works as well as a butter factory in the town. Walhalla, in the north-east of the Shire, is a mining township, 106 miles from Melbourne, on a narrow gauge branch railway from Moe. It is situated in moun­tainous country with beautiful scenery, and is an ideal and popular tourist resort. In former years gold mining was carried on by the Long Tunnel Company, and rich yields were had. Many excellent tourist trips may be had from this centre.

THE SHIRE OF OMEO.

Proclaimed a Shire in 1872.

Area-2211 sq. miles. Population-2900. Dwellings-706. Length of roads-1255 miles. Average rainfall-26 inches. Altitude-the Shire is traversed by the Great Dividing Range and rises in places to 6200 feet.

Valuations, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £1,042,580; Nett Annual Value, £52,129.

Rate, 1945-General rate of 2/3d. in the £ levied on Nett Annual Values.

Enlistments from the Shire-figures not com­plete, but 200 approximately.

Newspaper- “The Omeo Standard and Mining Gazette,” published at Omeo weekly on Thursday.

Electoral Divisions-Federal: Gippsland. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., Gipps­land East.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL, 1945-46.

President-Cr. J. M. Poulson.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. A. M. Pearson, J.P.; L. W. Cousins; M. J. O’Brien; J. S. Langtree, J.P.; J. M. McCoy;
R. T. Johnston, J.P.; A. W. Soutter, J.P.; G. A. Paterson, J.P.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Secretary-P. J. McMahon. F.C.I. (Eng.).

The Council meets on the first Tuesday in the month.

Shire Headquarters-Omeo.

This Shire is situated in North Gippsland and much of its area of 2211 square miles is situated high up in the Australian Alps. The large Shire area is crossed in about the middle by the Great Dividing Range, and the northern part of the Shire particularly com­ prises mountainous country with som:e very high peaks. It is well watered by a number of rivers which rise in the mountains in­ cluding the Tambo River, which flows south into the sea near the Gippsland Lakes, the Nicholson River, on its western boundary. which also flows south, and in the northern portion of the Shire the Milla Milla River, the Benambra River and the Bundarra River, all of which flow to the north on the other side of the Range. Between the mountains and in the more southern areas there is much fertile soil, but practically the whole Shire area is at present devoted almost exclusively to cattle and sheep raising. There are vast areas of land at Benambra on the northern side of the range and Swift’s Creek on the southern side of the Range, which are excep­ tionally fertile and capable of prolific agricul­ tural production, but the same has not yet been opened up to agriculture.

Omeo, the Shire headquarters, is situated about the middle of the Shire on the northern side of the Range at an altitude of over 2000 feet and is a noted tourist resort. In this district there is some agricultural activity and dairying as well as mining, and a butter factory is situated in the town. It has a population of 600, a good water supply ob­tained from Livingstone Creek, and electricity. Two modern hotels provide first-class accom­ modation, and in addition good class board­ing houses cater for the tourist. The nearest rail head is at Bairnsdale, 84 miles away, from whence Omeo is reached by service car, daily trips being run. It is a centre through which many tourist roads pass, and in par­ticular the very fine Alpine Highway, which runs from Bright, through glorious mountain scenery, southwards through Omeo, and then down to Bairnsdale. From this road and from Omeo most of Victoria’s alpine tourist resorts are approached, Mount Hotham and Mount Bogong being within easy distance of the township. Within this mountain area sur­ rounding Omeo there are a number of moun­ tain peaks all over 5000 feet above sea level. and they are under snow from June to November each year. They are famous for their panoramic magnificence, their fine winter sports, and opportunities for motoring, hiking and riding in summer. The Omeo State Highway traverses the Shire and pro­ vides motorists with an excellent tour. In the neighbourhood of the township are nume­ rous streams which provide excellent trout fishing. There is a Government battery in the town and considerable mining is again going on in this area. The District Hospital was destroyed by fire in 1839 and a very fine modern hospital, well equipped, has now been built. A Pastoral and Agricultural Society functions at Omeo. Benambra, in the northern part of the Shire, is a grazing and dairying district on the Omeo Plains, and both here and at Omeo are a number of very fine Hereford cattle studs, and the Heretords from this area are known all over ihe State for their very high quality. To the east of Benambra considerable mining opera­tions are carried on at Gibbo. At Glen valley is the well-known Maude and Yellow Girl gold mine, which has been in operation for over 50 years, and has been and still is a very consistent gold producer. The mine employs about 70 men and is equipped with a very modern hydro-electric plant; it is about 31 miles from Omeo. There are a number of oiher mining settlements throughout the Shire, and in the southern portion along the Tambo River there are dairying and agricultural villages including that of Ensay and Swift’s Creek. The whole area of this Shire is rich in mining potentialities, pos­sibilities of intense agricultural production and unlimited opportunities for the tourist.

THE SHIRE OF ORBOST.

Proclaimed in 1892 as Croajingolong Shire and name changed to Orbost Shire in 1893.

Area-3676 sq. miles. Population-5555. Dwellings- 1329. Length of roads-366 miles. Average rainfall-32 inches. Altitude-this varies from sea level up to 4000 feet in the alpine country in the north-west of the Shire. The township of Orbost is 1000 feet above sea level.

Valuation, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £1,571.220; Nett Annual Value, £78,561.

Rate, 1945-General rate of 2/3d. in the £ levied on Nett Annual Values.

Honour Winners from the Shire-C. P. McCoy, D.F.C.; B. Stevens, D.C.M.; F. Joiner, D.F.C.; N. Johnston, D.C.M.; A. Moseley, D.F.C.

Newspaper- “The Snowy River Mail,” pub­lished at Orbost weekly on Wednesdays.

Electoral Divisions-Federal: Gippsland. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., Gipps­land East.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL, 1945-46.

President-Cr. S. J. W. Lynn.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. A. Cameron, J.P.; H. Ingram, J.P.; W. G. Robinson; K. Lynn; J. Perry, J.P.; F. C. Minchin; R. A. Johnston; R. J. Luckins; D. J. Nichol; E. W. Johnston; J. Armstrong, J.P.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Secretary, Collector and Valuer-H. McK. Silke.
Treasurer-W. S. Murray.
Health Inspector-M. W. Cowell.
Health Officer-Dr. R. Nettleton, M.B., B.S.

The Council meets on the first Thursday in the month.

Shire Headquarters- Orbost.

This Shire covers an area of Victoria which is at the extreme eastern tip of the State, and its northern border line is that of the State of New South Wales. It is one of the largest Shires in the State and while well roaded it is in parts still undeveloped, there being large areas of good agricultural and grazing land awaiting se1tlement. In the inland part of the Shire towards the New South Wales boxder the country is very hilly and moun­tainous, but slopes gradually downwards to­wards the coast. The mountain areas and much of the areas even near the coast are very heavily timbered and the well-famed Gippsland forest and its giant eucalypis are found in this area. The Snowy River runs along the whole length of the western bor­der of the Shire and the Brodribb River, the Cann River and a number of other rivers run through the Shire area. Along these river flats and especially the Snowy River flats the soil is very rich and capable of prolific production. The Snowy River flats are very fertile over an area of 35,000 acres, and other river flats amount to a total of about 16,000 acres. The grazing area covers about 450,000 acres and the forest areas comprise 580,000 acres.

Industries comprise dairying on a very ex­tensive scale, maize and bean growing, graz­ing of fat and store cattle. Pigs and sheep and the production of wool and mixed farm­ing are widely carried on. Large quantities of vegetables are produced and the weights of vegetable despatched from the Shire during the period from February, 1944, to September, 1944, were: redbeet 900 tons, car­rots 772 tons, cabbages 273 tons, parsnip 3 tons, swede turnips 1 ton. Very large quan­tities of maize and both dry and green beans are also grown.

Sawmilling is a very big industry and for the year 1943-44 the timber output from the Shire was as follows:-

Orbost Forest District.

Mill logs, hardwood1,171,827 s. ft.
Sawn timber, hardwood169,037 s. ft.
Sawn timber, wattle312,880 s. ft.
Sleepers-number25,562
Beams20,380 s. ft.
Poles32,770 lin. ft.
Piles3,332 lin. ft.
Wattle bark4 tons.

Cann Valley & Mallacoota District.

Sleepers-number1,175
Beams116, 143 s. ft.
Poles7, 752 lin. ft.

Fishing along the coast east of Orbost is a flourishing industry, and thousands of boxes of fish are consigned annually from Orbost. From this stretch of coast between May, 1944, and September, 1944, 4273 boxes, which did not include fish caught in New South Wales waters, were consigned. A much larger number of boxes are sent through the Orbost railway station for fish caught in New South Wales waters. The Shire township of Orbost is situated at the terminus of the Gippsland railway on the main Prince’s Highway and has a population of 2500. It is 237 miles east of Melbourne by rail and all amenities, including town waer supply and electricity are available.

Along the whole stretch of coast from the New South Wales border to Lakes Entrance, just beyond the borders of this Shire, there are many excellent inlets and fishing cen­tres, the chief of them being Marlo and Mal­lacoota. The whole coastline is a veritable paradise for anglers; inlet, river and open sea fishing being available. Marlo is at the mouth of the famous Snowy River and all kinds of fish abound. Quail, duck and snipe shooting also offer good sport. Mallacoota inlet, near the border, is a beautiful stretch of water with gorgeous scenery, plenty of fish and abundant wild fowl. Many tourist roads cross the Shire. The main Interstate coastal road, the Prince!s Highway, runs from east to west through the Shire about 25 miles from the coast; Bonang Highway branches from the Prince• Highway at Orbost and runs through magnificent agricul­tural and heavily timbered country to Bom­bala in New South Wales, and from Cann River the King’s Highway runs north to Bom­bala. Local tourist roads are Orbost to Marlo 10 miles, Orbost to the famous Buchan Caves 40 miles, Prince’s Highway to Syden­ ham Inlet 11 miles, and to Tamboon Inlet 15 miles, and from Genoa to Mallacoota Inlet 15 miles. On all these roads the tourist finds fine inland waterways and rivers and majes­tic forest grandeur.

THE SHIRE OF ROSEDALE.

Created a District in 1869 and proclaimed a Shire in 1871.

Area-1000 sq. miles. Population- 4046, Dwellings- 1009. Length of roads-450 miles. Average rainfall-34 inches. Altitude-58 feet at Rosedale Township.

Valuations, 1945-Unimproved Capital Value, £1,305,022; Improved Capital Value, £2,645,923; Nett Annual Value, £134,422.

Rates, 1945-General rate of 1½d. in the £ in Shire, and 3d. in the £ extra in townships, all levied on Unimproved Capital Values.

Newspaper-“The Rosedale Courier,” pub­lished weekly on Tuesdays.

Electoral Divisions-Federal: Gippsland. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., Gipps­land South; Gippsland North; Walhalla.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL, 1945-46.

President-Cr. C. F. Pedersen.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. C. Ayres, J.P.; J. Bermingham, J.P.; J. L. Gove; A. L. Fischer, J.P.; C. Jones; W. ­Henderson, J.P.; N. T. Farley; D. N. Christensen.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Shire Secretary-W. O. Maguire, J.P.
Engineer-S. J. Bowden.
Clerk-J. L. Williams.
Dairy Supervisor-R. Dawe.
Health Inspector-W. U. Hughes.

The Council meets on the third Monday in the month.

Shire Headquarters-Rosedale.

The Shire of Rosedale is situated on the eastern coast at Victoria inland from the famous Ninety Mile Beach. It consists main­ly of undulating country which is in parts heavily timbered, and the cleared country is used for general farming, cattle and sheep breeding and dairying.

The Shire township of Rosedale is on the Latrobe River and is 110 miles east of Mel­bourne by rail on the Gippsland railway. Rosedale has a population of 700, water sup­ply and electricity, adequate sporting facili­ties and two hotels. Other townships are Glengarry, with a population of about 150, in the neighbourhood of which dairying and timber-getting are carried on; Cowwarr, a pastoral and dairying township near the Thomson River; and Longford, a similar area on the Latrobe River. There are a number of butter factories in the Shire, including one at Rosedale, Cowwarr and Glengarry.

THE SHIRE OF SOUTH GIPPSLAND.

Proclaimed a Shire in 1894 on severance from Alberton Shire.

Area-551 sq. miles. Population- 4470. Dwellings- 1190. Length of road:-303 miles. Average rainfall-40 to 45 inches. Altitude-varies from sea level on the coast up to 2000 feet inland.

Valuations, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £1,345.540; Nett Annual Value, £67,277.

Rate, 1945-General rate of 2/9d. in the £ levied on Nett Annual Values.

Enlistments from the Shire-approximately 300.

Newspaper-“The Foster Mirror,” publish­ed at Foster weekly on Thursdays.

Electoral Divisions-Federal: Gippsland. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., Gipps­land South; Wonthaggi.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL, 1945-46.

President-Cr. J. R. Clements.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. P. L. C. Vagg; L. J. Charlton; C. A. Schmidt; J. Davies; J. G. Jones; E. W. Warner; A. R. Sutherland; A. B. Hamilton.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Secretary-W. S. Pearl, F.I.M.A.
Engineer-H. M. Rooney, C.E., L.S.
Health Officers-Dr. H. C. Wilson, M.B., B.S.; Dr. A. Deery, M.D.
Health Inspector-L. L. Slater.

The Council meets on the second Thursday in the month.

Shire Headquarters-Foster.

This Shire occupies the area of the South Gippsland Peninsula at the extreme south­ eastern corner of Victoria and a large por­tion of Wilson’s Promontory, the most southern point of Australia, is reserved for a National Park. In this park all animals are protected. Otherwise the Shire district is mainly a pastoral and dairying area, there being some cattle and sheep raising. The dairying in­dustry is considerable and for the year 1944 there were 508 registered daily farmers who were milking 16,661 cows, and about 1500 tons of butter was produced. There are three butter factories in the Shire, one at the Shire township of Foster and others at Toora and Fish Creek.

Foster is a well-equipped rural and tourist township, 108 miles from Melbourne on the South Gippsland railway. It has a popula­tion of about 650 and is equipped with a water supply and electricity. Sporting facili­ ties are good, and there is some magnificent scenery close to the township. A new road to Foster connects with the National Park for Darby Chalet, and there is much mountain, forest and sea scenery. Eight miles away from the town are some good beaches on Corner Inlet. The country generally is very auriferous and around Foster there are allu­vial and quartz formations and large deposits of gravel which are used for road-making.

Toora, on the same railway line about 10 miles from Foster, is the centre of a dairying and mining district. It has electric light and water supply and adequate recreation faili­ ties, including a swimming pool. About five miles away are the Agnes Falls on the Agns River, which are accessible by a fme tounst road. At Toora tin and gold are found, and work preliminary to the setting up of a sluicing plant for the recovery of these minerals is now being carried on.

A very large fishing industry is centred at Port Welshpool and at Port Franklin. Pot Welshpool has a population of 150 and is situated on the shore of Corner Inlet. It has a fish-packing shed a pier for steamers, and natural shelter advantages for shipping. Port Franklin with a population of 150 is also on the same inlet eight miles from Foster. It has electric light and water supply and is the centre of a large professional fishing industry. An outstanding feature of. the Shire is the white lighthouse on the hp of Wilson’s Promontory and the nearby National Park of 100,000 acres.

THE SHIRE OF TAMBO.

Proclaimed a Shire in 1882.

Area-1340 sq. miles. Population-4308. Dwellings- 1175. Length of roads-282 miles. Average rainfall-32 inches. Altitude-500 feet.

Valuations, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £1,153,760; Nett Annual Value, £57,68.

Rate, 1945-General rate of 2s. in the £ levied on Nett Annual Values.

Newspaper-“The Bruthen Times,” publish­ed weekly on Thursdays.

Electoral Divisions-Federal: Gippsland. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., East Gippsland.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL, 1945-46.

President-Cr. V. K. Carstairs, J.P.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. J. J. Duke, J.P.; A. A. Connley; A. J. Howlett, J.P.; R. T. Redenbach; H. Clues, J.P.; D. E. Timmins, J.P.; E. W. Keat; W. de B. Dalley; A. Gillies, J.P.; R. J. G. Morkham, J.P.; O. A. G. Crawford.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Secretary, Collector-T. F. Rollason.
Shire Engineer and Building Surveyor-H. E. Bellamy.
Treasurer-A. H. Morris.
Health Inspector-W. H. O’Doherty.
Health Officer-Dr. L. E. Clay, M.B.

The Council meets on the third Wednesday in the month.

Shire Headquarters-Bruthen.

Comprising a narrow strip of country about 80 to 100 miles long and from 15 to 30 miles wide in parts, the Shire of Tambo stretches north from the eastern coast of Victoria, at Lakes Entrance, to the New South Wales border below Mount Kosciusko. The country varies greatly, rising from rich alluvial flats along the rivers and on the coast to moun­tainous, heavily timbered areas in the northern part, where the Great Dividing Range and other mountains rise.

Grazing and farming are the chief pur­suits of the inhabitants and the flats along the Nicholson and Tambo Rivers are particu­larly fertile. Dairy farming is widely car­ried on, cattle are fattened for market, and large quantities of maize, carrots, potatoes, peas, beans and other vegetables are grown. Many pigs are raised and bee-farming is a considerable industry. Much timber is cut from the heavily timbered parts of the Shire and a constant supply is maintained to the Victorian railways and the State Electricity Commission.

Bruthen, the Shire headquarters, is 190 miles from Melbourne on the east coastline and has a population of 580; it is provided with water supply and electricity. Tambo Upper is off the railway line, but easily accessible to Bairnsdale, and in this neigh­bourhood large quantities of wattle bark are stripped. Various minerals are found in the Shire, gold being mined in a number of places, and silver, lead and ironstone are also found.

On the coast at the end of the well-known Ninety Mile Beach is the town of Lakes Entrance. With a permanent population of 1200, this watering place is a popular tourist and fishing resort. It is situated on the Prince’s Highway, 198 miles from Melbourne, and has three hotels and many guest houses. There is a spacious, modern camping ground for motorists and the fishing enthusiast is given ample opportunities to indulge in this sport. Boating, including steamer trips to Bairnsdale, is available, and the Gippsland lakes and several rivers may be explored. Metung with a population of 105 is a fishing village on the north-east shores of the Gipps­ land lakes and caters for a fishing and swim­ming holiday.

Of special interest within the Shire are the famous Buchan Caves, situated in the vicinity of the township of Buchan, population 100. These wonderful caves are 36 miles from Lakes Entrance by a good motor road and they provide an extraordinary fantasy of patterns in stalactites and stalagmites. To the eastward of Lakes Entrance lies Lake Tyers, with an area of six square miles, which is out­ standing in its beauty in all this area of lakes and waterways.

THE SHIRE OF TRARALGON.

Proclaimed a Shire in 1879.

Area-199 sq. miles. Population-5000. Dwellings-1000. Length of roads-185 miles. Average rainfall-28 inches. Altitude–140 feet at Traralgon.

Valuations, 1945–Improved Capital Value, £1,534,000; Nett Annual Value, £76,700.

Rates, 1945-General rate of 2s. in the £ in East and Central Ridings and of 2/6d. in the £ in the Town Riding, levied on Nett Annual Values.

Enlistments from the Shire-approximately 600.

Newspaper-“The Journal-Record,” publish­ed at Traralgon on Mondays and Thursdays.

Electoral Divisions-Federal: Gippsland. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., Gipps­land South; Walhalla.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL, 1945-46.

President-Cr. W. E. Cumming.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. D. G. MacCubbin, J.P.; R. A. Felstead; D. Hourigan; A. Allen; T. Riley; JI.I:. Drane; D. G. Gilmour; E. Sanders; H. Saunders; E. Farmer; P. Johnson.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Shire Secretary-Miss E. M. West, A.I.C.A.
Shire Engineer-S. J. Bowden, C.E.
Health Officer-Dr. T. A. McLean, M.B.

The Council meets on the second Friday in the month.

Shire Headquarters-Traralgon.

This Shire covers an agricultural and pas­toral area in the South Gippsland district in Eastern Victoria, and is crossed in the north by the main Gippsland railway. In the northern portion there is well-watered, flat country with some timber, but in the southern part it is more hilly and broken and heavily timbered. The soil is, however, very fertile. Primary industries are dairying, sheep, cattle and pig raising and fattening and the grow­ing of fruit. There are extensive brown coal deposits in the area.

The Shire township of Traralgon is 97 miles east of Melbourne on the main Gipps­ land railway, and is a well-equipped rural town with water supply, gas, electricity from Yallourn, four hotelq, Higher Elementary School. and a good concrete swimming baths. Industries include an Australian Paper Manu­facturers Limited paper and pulp mill, a clothing factory, a cordial factory, a bacon­ curing factory, butter factories and three saw­ mills. The paper mill is about six miles outside the township. To the north, about one mile from the town is the Latrobe River on the northern boundary of the Shire.

Throughout the Shire there is much excel­ lent scenery and many points of interest to the tourist. Roads are excellent and lead along a number of creeks and through parks and beautiful valleys. Tyers, in the north of the Shire, is a dairying settlement where there is a butter factory. Near this township there are large deposits of limestone.

THE SHIRE OF WARRAGUL.

Proclaimed a Shire in 1881.

Area-137 sq. miles. Population-3600. Dwellings- 1580. Length of roads-255 miles. Average rainfall-35 inches. Altitude-360 feet at Warragul.

Valuations, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £2.414,760; Nett Annual Value, £120,738.

Rate, 1945-General rate of 2/6d. in the £levied on Nett Annual Values.

Newspapers-“The Warragul Gazette,” published weekly on Tuesdays; “The Warragul Guardian,” published weekly on Tuesdays.

Electoral Divisions – Federal: Fliners. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., Walhalla.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL, 1945-46.

President-Cr. F. Rush.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. J. Logan, J.P.; G. A. Bell; M. Steward; W. A. Gaul; A. Jamieson; P. E. JleDonald: E. G. Roberts; W. C. Kingston, J.P.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Secretary and Engineer-A. G. Thomas.
Assistant Secretary-R. W. Leask.
Clerical Officer-N. M. James.
Clerk-H. I. J. Randall.

The Council meets on the second Tuesday in the month.

Shire Headquarters-Warragul.

This Shire is situated in the south-eastern portion of Victoria, being crossed, about the middle, by the main Gippsland railway line. It is comprised of agricultural and grazing country where these pursuits are carried on, and also considerable dairying. Products of the area are sheep, fat lambs, all root crops, potatoes and wheat; a large quantity of fruit is also grown.

The Shire headquarters are situated in the town of Warragul, which is 61 miles east of Melbourne on the Gippsland railway. It is a farming township with excellent facilities, a town water supply from a weir on the Tarago River, sewerage service, gas supply and electricity from Yallourn. Sporting facilities are adequate, including a swimming baths and a golf course; there is a High School and Primary School. It is a law centre where a County Court and general sessions are held quarterly. Industries in the town­ ship include a flour mill, two butter fac­tories, cheese factory and a casein factory, a frock factory and a rope factory. There are swimming baths, a Municipal saleyards, a public hospital and five hotels. Agricul­tural and horticultural societies are active bodies and all sporting facilities, including race clubs, gun clubs, showground and motor cycle track, are found.

THE SHIRE OF WOORAYL.

Proclaimed a Shire in 1888.

Area-466¼ sq. miles. Population-6700. Dwellings- 1460. Length of roads-498 miles. Average rainfall-36 inches. Altitude-273 feet at Leongatha.

Valuations, 1945-Improved Capital Value, £2,289,900; Nett Annual Value, £114.495.

Rate, 1945-General rate of 2/9d. in the £ levied on Nett Annual Values.

Enlistments from the Shire-approximately 500.

Newspapers-“The Leongatha Echo,” pub­lished weekly on Wednesdays; “The Great Southern Star,” published at Leongatha on Tuesdays and Fridays.

Electoral Divisions-Federal: Gippsland. State: L.C., Gippsland Province. L.A., Gipps­land South; Wonthaggi.

THE SHIRE COUNCIL, 1945-46.

President-Cr. A. J. Sloan, J.P.

COUNCILLORS.

Crs. W. J. Holt; G. Henderson; K. M. Macdonald; W. B. Hughes; C. A. S. Bond. J.P.; R. E. Mcindoe; H. P. Williams, J.P.; G. C. Ashenden.

SHIRE OFFICERS.

Shire Secretary-C. H. Lyon.
Shire Engineer-W. J. C. Bate, C.E.
Health Officer-Dr. G. F. Bennett, M.D.

The Council meets on the first Wednesday in the month.

Shire Headquarters-Leongatha.

The Shire of Woorayl covers a very pros­ perous and progressive farming, grazing and dairying district in the southern Gippsland portion of the State. It is situated to the east of the Borough of Wonthaggi and the south coast of the Stale is its southern boundary nearly as far as the Gippsland Peninsula. The northern part of the Shire is crossed by the main Gippsland railway. Near the coast the country is fairly level and in other parts undulating to hilly, until in the northern area it is somewhat mountainous and very heavily timbered. The rainfall of 36 inches is very generous, and as a very large portion of the Shire area is renowned as having the best chocolate and grey soils in Victoria, agricultural and dairying produc­tion is prolific; products including milk, but­ter, cheese, flax, sheep, cattle and pigs, potatoes and onions.

The Shire Hall is situated in the township of Leongatha, which has a population of 1750, and is 78 miles from Melbourne by rail. Public facilities include water supply and electricity and an authority has been estab­lished for the construction of sewerage works. Sporting facilities are adequate and in this area there is some excellent mountain scenery. Industries within the town include a flax mill, a milk powder factory, a milk paste factory, a clothing factory and a but­ter factory, and apart from a State School and a Convent School there is an Agricultural High School.

The Shire area receives considerable tourist patronage, well-known holiday places being Inverloch and Walkerville. Inverloch is situ­ated on Anderson’s Inlet on the coast ad­jacent to the Borough of Wonthaggi. and is a favourite seaside resort with excellent tourist facilities. Walkerville is on Waratah Bay near the South Gippsland Peninsula and is well known for its fine bathing beach and other holiday facilities.