BSc (Birmingham), PhD (Bristol)

Psychology
1999

Michael Hogg (PhD, Bristol) is Professor and Chair of Social Psychology at Claremont Graduate University, in Los Angeles, an Honorary Professor at the University of Kent, in the UK, a former Australian Research Council Professorial Fellow, and a past President of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology. He is the recipient of the International Society for Self and Identity’s 2020 Distinguished Lifetime Career Awardthe Society for Personality and Social Psychology’s 2010 Carol and Ed Diener Mid-Career Award in Social Psychology, and the Australian Psychological Society’s 1989 Early Career Award. He is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, and the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. Michael Hogg’s research on group processes, intergroup relations, influence and leadership, and self and identity is associated with the development of social identity theory, and has been widely published (close to 400 scientific publications that have been cited more than 115,000 times, h-index 130).  He is foundation Editor-in-Chief with Dominic Abrams of the journal Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, an Associate Editor of The Leadership Quarterly, and a former Associate Editor of the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. Current research foci include leadership and influence, uncertainty and extremism, exclusion and marginalization, and subgroup dynamics within groups.

Michael Hogg is currently professor of social psychology and chair of the social psychology program at Claremont Graduate University in Los Angeles, and an honorary professor of psychology at the University of Kent in the UK. Past faculty appointments include Bristol University (1981-84), Macquarie University (1985-86), University of Melbourne (1986-90), University of Queensland (1991-06) and Princeton University (1997-98).

He is the recipient of the International Society for Self and Identity's 2020 Distinguished Lifetime Career Award; the 2010 Carol and Ed Diener Award in Social Psychology from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology – “for outstanding contributions to the fields of personality and social psychology for scientists in their mid-career”; and the 1989 Early Career Award from the Australian Psychological Society.

A selection of more recent publications:

  • Hogg M. A., & Vaughan, G. M. (2021). Social psychology (9th ed.). London: Pearson.
  • Hogg, M. A. (2021). Uncertain self in a changing world: A foundation for radicalization, populism, and autocratic leadership. European Review of Social Psychology, 32(2), in press.
  • Hogg, M. A. (2021). Self-uncertainty and group identification: Consequences for social idenitity, group behavior, intergroup relations, and society. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 64, 263-316.
  • Abrams, D., Lalot, F., & Hogg, M. A. (2021). Intergroup and intragroup dimensions of COVID-19: A social identity perspective on social fragmentation and unity. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 24(2), 201-209.
  • Hogg, M. A. (2019). Radical change. Uncertainty in the world threatens our sense of self: To cope, people embrace populism. Scientific American, 321(3), 85-87.
  • Hogg, M. A. (2018). Self-uncertainty, leadership preference, and communication of social identity. Atlantic Journal of Communication, 26, 111-121.
  • Hogg, M. A. (2018). Social identity theory. In P. J. Burke (Ed.), Contemporary social psychological theories (2nd ed.) (pp. 112-138). Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
  • Rast, D. E. III, Hogg, M. A., & Van Knippenberg, D. (2018). Intergroup leadership across distinct subgroups and identities. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 44, 1090-1103.
  • Kerr, N. L., Ao, X., Hogg, M. A., & Zhang, J. (2018). Addressing replicability concerns via adversarial collaboration: Discovering hidden moderaors of the minimal intergroup discrimination effect. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 78, 66-76.
  • Hohman, Z. P., Gaffney, A. M., & Hogg, M. A. (2017). Who am I if I am not like my group? Self-uncertainty and feeling peripheral in a group. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 72, 125-132.
  • Hogg, M. A., Abrams, D., & Brewer, M. B. (2017). Social identity: The role of self in group processes and intergroup relations. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 20, 570-581.
  • Hogg, M. A. (2016). Social identity theory. In S. McKeown, R. Haji, & N. Ferguson (Eds.), Understanding peace and conflict through social identity theory: Contemporary global perspectives (pp. 3-17). New York: Springer.
  • Hohman, Z. P., & Hogg, M. A. (2015). Fearing the uncertain: Self-uncertainty plays a role in mortality salience. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 57, 31-42.
  • Hogg, M. A. (2015). Constructive leadership across groups: How leaders can combat prejudice and conflict between subgroups. Advances in Group Processes, 32, 177-207.
  • Hogg, M. A. (2014). From uncertainty to extremism: Social categorization and identity processes. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 23, 338-342.
  • Hogg, M. A., Kruglanski, A., & Van den Bos, K. (Eds.) (2013). Uncertainty and extremism. Issue 69, number 3, of the Journal of Social Issues. Boston: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Hogg, M. A. (2012). Social identity and the psychology of groups. In M. R. Leary & J. P. Tangney (Eds.), Handbook of self and identity (2nd ed., pp. 502-519). New York: Guilford.
  • Hogg, M. A., van Knippenberg, D., & Rast, D. E. III. (2012). Intergroup leadership in organizations: Leading across group and intergroup boundaries. Academy of Management Review, 37, 232-255.
  • Hogg, M. A., van Knippenberg, D., & Rast, D. E. III. (2012). The social identity theory of leadership: Theoretical origins, research findings, and conceptual developments. European Review of Social Psychology, 23, 258-304.
  • Hogg, M. A. (2012). Uncertainty-identity theory. In P. A. M. Van Lange, A. W. Kruglanski, & E. T. Higgins (Eds.), Handbook of theories of social psychology (Vol. 2, pp. 62-80). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Hogg, M. A. (2010). Influence and leadership. In S. T. Fiske, D. T. Gilbert, & G. Lindzey (Eds.), Handbook of social psychology (5th ed., Vol. 2, pp. 1166-1207). New York: Wiley.
  • Hogg, M. A., Adelman, J. R., & Blagg, R. D. (2010). Religion in the face of uncertainty: An uncertainty-identity theory account of religiousness. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 14, 72-83.
  • Hogg, M. A. (2007). Uncertainty-identity theory. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 39, 69-126.
  • Cooper, J., & Hogg, M. A. (2007). Feeling the anguish of others: A theory of vicarious dissonance. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 39, 359-403.
  • Hogg, M. A., & Smith, J. R. (2007). Attitudes in social context: A social identity perspective. European Review of Social Psychology, 18, 89-131.
  • Abrams, D., & Hogg, M. A. (2004). Metatheory: Lessons from social identity research. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 8, 98-106.
  • Hogg, M. A., & Van Knippenberg, D. (2003). Social identity and leadership processes in groups. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 35, 1-52.
  • Hogg, M. A. (2001). A social identity theory of leadership. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 5, 184-200.
  • Hornsey, M. J., & Hogg, M. A. (2000). Assimilation and diversity: An integrative model of subgroup relations. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 4, 143-156.
  • Hogg, M. A., & Terry, D. J. (2000). Social identity and self-categorization processes in organizational contexts. Academy of Management Review, 25, 121-140.